Tag Archives: mountain life

Final Full Moon of the Decade

I got home late last night after an amazing trip. My flight was delayed and I managed to get the very last seat standby seat on a different flight (thanks United!)

I didn’t see the moon on the ride home from the airport, but the night was illuminated so I hoped it would come into view along the way. Only when I was out of the car and on my front steps, did I catch it.

For me, this has been The Year of the Moon from the release of my debut ALIANA REACHES FOR THE MOON to the wonderful celebrations around the world of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.

Don’t forget to look up in awe.

Dear Deer

Dear Deer,

It was so kind of you to stop by. I enjoyed our photo shoot and wanted to send you a few of my favorites. I hope you like the one showing off your crown of flora.

With admiration and love,

Laura

Sunrise and Sunshine Blogger Award

#Nofilter sunrise
#Nofilter sunrise

I’ve been nominated for the Sunshine Blogger award by Lee Cleaver,  and I’m breaking the rules because I’m supposed to answer a bunch of questions and nominate other bloggers, but if you follow me, you know my blog is one of photography, art, music, poetry, and Charlie.

Hey Lee, I answered one of your questions and described my blog in 5 words. Thanks for the nomination.

Full Moon #Frostmoon

Driving in the mountains, I’m often greeted by a view that takes my breath away. These photos were preceded by a gasp. I love the full moon, as anyone who follows this blog already knows. It was the inspiration for my first book.

But the full moon, hanging low in the still blue sky is magical.

Turtle Rock

When I moved to Colorado, everyone in the neighborhood called this peak Turtle Rock.

I’ve climbed to the top many times because it’s so close to my house.

It’s where we watched the solar eclipse.

It’s the first climb I took Charlie on back when I could easily pick him up, before he could leap over any obstacle.

It’s where I’ve seen some magnificent sunsets.

It affords 360 views that include the continental divide and most recently dozens of elk.

But it wasn’t until this summer, when I looked at it from this angle, that I understood why it’s called Turtle Rock.